+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 48 of 48
  1. #41
    Thanks fellas!

    Sadly all did not go well with the dyno, we discovered a MASSIVE leak from between the V once the bike reached high temperature from what I can only assume is the thermostat.

    Normally it's just a matter of removing the airbox and fuel rails to access the V, sadly someone, probably me, put the intake boot clamps on the wrong way when I dropped the engine last time, meaning they cant be accessed from the gap in the frame they usually are, meaning I'm going to have to drop the whole engine out to access them...


  2. #42
    ASF Premium Full Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    sydney, nsw, Australia.
    Posts
    2,334
    now that is a motherfucker.
    more titanium than my bike

  3. #43
    ASF Gold Full Member LKC73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Posts
    1,406
    Oh shit, that's a huge pain in the arss. Poor bugger.
    Street Monster GSXR 7/11 water heater!
    Project R1 underway, The "Raven"

  4. #44
    Bloke with the stick Gix11's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    17,281
    Blog Entries
    34
    My "That-sucks" meter just started giving a reading.....

  5. #45
    After many long hours of labour and much swearing, I managed to lever the throttle bodies off without removing the engine!





    And I think we've found the culprit...





    Pulled out the thermostat and little hose nipple thingies, sure enough o-rings were completely stuffed, they also smelt like shit which can't be a good sign.





    Replacements ordered, in the meantime I have some plans with fans, specifically 3 80mm PC cooling fans which will fit in nicely behind the radiator.


    Only thing I'm struggling with is how to wire them so they activate at a certain temperature now that the stock temp sensor is no longer connected. Any ideas?

  6. #46
    ASF Premium Full Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    sydney, nsw, Australia.
    Posts
    2,334
    the fans circuit comes on by completing the earth. Temp sensor isn't needed.
    From memory, fan circuit is always getting power.
    the rad has a fan switch (brass threaded sensor, single spade connector) that threads into it. When that gets hot enough, it completes the earth circuit, fan comes on.
    I've earthed my rad to the frame.

    you can either put the fan switch back in the rad, or just wire in a manual override, or both.

    I've got 3x 80mm fans from jaycar on my rad.
    Last edited by hooligan; 16-11-2017 at 05:43 PM.
    more titanium than my bike

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by hooligan View Post
    the fans circuit comes on by completing the earth. Temp sensor isn't needed.
    From memory, fan circuit is always getting power.
    the rad has a fan switch (brass threaded sensor, single spade connector) that threads into it. When that gets hot enough, it completes the earth circuit, fan comes on.
    I've earthed my rad to the frame.

    you can either put the fan switch back in the rad, or just wire in a manual override, or both.

    I've got 2 80mm fans from jaycar on my rad.
    Ok cool, I'm running the VFR750 rad which has a single pin temp sensor on the left side, assuming that's the same thing.

    How's the cooling? I reckon I can fit in two 120mm 150cfm fans which should be enough to keep the bike from overheating when stopped.

  8. #48
    ASF Premium Full Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    sydney, nsw, Australia.
    Posts
    2,334
    I commuted on it, so good enough for me - I only want to use it for open road/track day shenanigans, so if it commutes at 100, open road i'm sweet.
    And yes, same thing.
    I could only fit 80's in because my custom rad is small.
    more titanium than my bike

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Untitled Document

 

HELP SUPPORT THOSE THAT SUPPORT US - CHECK OUT THESE WEBSITES........

AustraliaHurtle Gear Motorcycle Accessories AustraliaMotorcycle Tyre Warehouse100s of aftermarket parts and accessories for your motorcycle from Rated R Motorcycle Parts
Rapid Bikes Magazine available monthly throughout Australia & New ZealandEvery rider is individual so why not show your bikes individuality with a custom seat or embroided logo on your seat  in a color and design of your choice.Trooper Lus Garage for motorcycle parts, service and much moreWorld Wide Bomber Magazine, Streetfighters from around the world - ONLINE
Visit Face it graphix for all your bike stickers and helmet stickers Visit Dash Designs for all your website and design needs Advertise on ASF and get your business seen by 1000s of visitors every month Advertise on ASF and get your business seen by 1000s of visitors every month
 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts